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Finding Yore Way Round the Snider Family Webpage



John W. Snider Family History


Willie (Snider)Storemski Family History


Connie (Snider) Kubiak Family History


William Marion (Bill) Snider Family History


Bruno Snider Family History


Christine (Snider)Knapik Family History


Louis Snider Family History


Lee Snider Family History

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WELCOME to the Connie (Kubiak)Snider Family History Page.





CONNIE KUBIAK (SNIDER) FAMILY

Connie Magdalyn Snider was born on July 5, 1915 in Robertson County,Texas, the daughter of Mike Snider (Suchowiak) and Veronica Grudziecki. Sometime in the mid 1920’s, Mike and Veronica Snider moved from the Post Oak community to the C.M. Cambell place in the community of Wooten Wells where they lived and operated the sharecropper’s farm until Veronica’s death in the winter of 1937.

Campbell was a wealthy landowner who also operated the only store in the area. He partitioned his large plantation into 60-acre tracts of land with a house and allowed farmers to work a given portion of the land in return for every fourth bale of cotton and every other load of corn. He would also loan each family $100 as living expenses through the year and for seed expenses. The loan would have to be paid back at harvest time. Mr. Campbell also owned and operated the only gin in the area, which was convenient for collecting his share for use of the land. Of course, he also earned ginning fees.

At an early age, the Mike Snider children began to help their parents with the chores associated with running a farm. John, Willie, Bill and Connie were the older children in the family and helped plow the fields alongside their dad, Mike Snider.

Connie recalls that she enjoyed plowing with mules if the mule was a fast one. "I didn't like no slow mule. We had a mule named Nell that was just too slow. You could holler at her, but she just wouldn't go no faster. Now Toby was some kind of a good mule. He done his share of work," Mother laughed as she remembered her childhood years.

Connie and the Boy Next Door In the mid-thirties, Connie began to date a young man from next door, John Kubiak. John was born on December 20, 1915, the oldest son of Louis and Clara (Kasowski) Kubiak.

John's parents, Clara Kasowski and Louis Kubiak, had earlier been neighbors in the farming hamlet of Post Oak before they married and settled down on the C.M. Campbell place next door to the Mike Snider family. Like many of the Polish settlers in those days, the Kubiak family was poor and had little or no education. Clara was further handicapped by a limited knowledge of English. Clara Kubiak continued to use her native tongue, Polish, throughout her entire life. However, her children attended public schools and were bilingual (spoke English and Polish). Clara's family had emigrated to the U.S. in the late 1890's and Clara was born on the ship while her mother was making that long journey to Texas. Louis's folks had come to Bremond in the 1870's. Louis and Clara settled down as sharecroppers on the C.M. Campbell place next door to the Mike Snider family. They had a total of nine children including: John, Frank, Lige, Ed, Ike, Floyd, Mike, Lee, Willie, and Verna.

John Kubiak grew up in Robertson County and attended Walnut School, and West End School where he and Connie first met. John and Connie were married by Father Szymanski at 9:00 AM on November 4, 1936 at St. Mary's Catholic Church in Bremond, Robertson County, Texas. John's brother, Ed Kubiak was the best man and Connie’s sister, Christine (Snider) Knapik was the maid of honor. It was during this time that Connie’s mother, Veronica, came down with the flu and continued to struggle with a respiratory infection for several months until developing pneumonia in February of 1937. Just three short months later, Connie lost her mother which had a devastating effect on the entire Snider family.

John and Connie Move to Reagan to Start a Family

In 1937, Connie and John heard that Joe Rumpell was looking for sharecroppers over in Falls County near Reagan. Mother's older brother, John Snider, was already living on the Rumpell place which was located about two miles west of Reagan. John and Connie raised livestock and farmed the land with mules, much like generations of farmers had done in the past.

This little farm was also the birthplace of John and Connie's first three children, Dan, Leonard and Jean. In those days, Doctor Sanders (and later Dr. Smith) would come out to the house when somebody sent word that the baby was on the way. A midwife always helped the expectant mother and sometimes delivered the baby if the doctor did not come in time.

Dan, their oldest son, was born on March 19, 1938 and John's mother, Clara Kubiak, served as the midwife. John Snider's wife, Lula, also helped Connie during her first couple of days after child birth. Dr. Sanders was the attending physician. Their second son, Leonard, was born on November 15, 1940 and was also delivered by Dr. Sanders. Jean was born at the same house on November 5, 1942 but delivered by Dr. Smith (who later delivered L.B.).

Connie remembers their first farm well, "It was a little shack near my brother John's place just west of Reagan off the Highbank road. I remember when our barn burned down. John had just finished loading the barn with corn and had gone to take the hands home when the barn went up in smoke. We had a hog penned up in that barn too. When I saw the fire, I ran and got my brother John who let the hog go free. We had a hen house next to the barn and it burned too. We couldn't do nothing about the fire... all we had was a well and that didn't do no good."

John Kubiak recalls, "On the Rumpell place, we had a big flock of turkeys and they'd go off in the woods. One time, a fox got to them and killed a whole bunch of turkeys and just left them in a pile. Didn't eat any of them. Just killed em!"

The Kubiak's were still farming the Rumpell place when they heard the news that Pearl Harbor had been bombed by the Japanese. Many young men in Bremond were drafted in the war against the Nazi's including several of John's brothers, but John was exempted because of his family and farming status.

Striking Little Brazos Gold

After four years of farming the hill top land, John and Connie were ready for a change. In January of 1943, John heard of a large farm that was available for sharecropping. This was the Thagert Kirkpatrick farm, which included rich bottomland of the Little Brazos River. Thagert’s wife, Mary, had been John and Connie’s grade school teacher at the West End School in Bremond. Since there was more land than John could work and several sharecropper bungalows already existed on the farm, John and Connie invited Kie and Willie Storemski to join them in farming the Kirkpatrick place. Connie's brother, Bruno Snider, and his wife, Verna (John Kubiak's sister) also settled just down the road where they rented the McCallum place. Another brother, Bill and his wife Rosie settled across the road on the old Averette place. All of the relatives, except Bruno, worked as sharecroppers (worked the farm for a percent of the harvest). Bruno worked for Claude Buell for wages. This was the closest the Snider family had lived to each other since the early depression.

Thagert also ran sheep on some of the land and Dan and Leonard recall watching an old sheep herder shear the wool from the sheep and how funny they looked afterwards.

The men worked the land on the Kirkpatrick farm using teams of mules (and later a tractor). When it came hoeing and harvest time, the women and older kids pitched in to help. The move to the Little Brazos bottom was difficult but turned out to be very profitable. In fact, all of the families earned enough money to go out and buy farms of their own (John bought a blacksmith shop in Reagan).

When I asked Mother about life on the Kirkpatrick place, she responded, "Nice place- really did like it there. And it was the only place we really made money in farming."

Reagan Gains a New Blacksmith

After gathering the crops in the fall of 1944, John and Connie decided to give up farming and go into business for themselves. John had heard they needed a blacksmith in Reagan and they had some cash from the successful year on the Kirkpatrick place. The war was also winding down in Europe and the talk on the streets was that the War would soon be over. The Kubiak family moved from the Kirkpatrick place and rented the old Pearson place where they raised a few acres in corn, a big garden and a few head of livestock.

In the spring of 1945, John bought the Lonnie Robbins Blacksmith Shop in Reagan, a thriving little town located some six miles to the North of Bremond. At this time, Reagan had a bank, three grocery stores, a five and dime, a drugstore, an icehouse, telephone office, a hardware store, post office, blacksmith shop, several gas stations, a garage, gin and a high school.

Kubiak’s Garage

The Robins blacksmith shop in Reagan had been built in the 1870’s and was equipped with a full compliment of tools including a device to repair spokes on wagon wheels, a hand-powered coal burning forge, a big anvil with a variety of blacksmith hammers and tools, a holding tank for water to cool the red hot metal heated on the forge and a variety of belt-driven tools including a power hammer, drill press and saws. Most of the tools were powered by an old electric motor that connected to the other tools through gin-type belts and idler pulleys. It was something to see all those belts in motion and to hear the old power hammer pound away as Dad sharpened sweeps and made tools and implements out of raw iron and steel.

On December 5, 1945, their fourth child, L.B. was born at the Pearson farm. Clara (Babushka) Kubiak again served as the mid-wife as she had done for the other children. During this period of time, Clara and Louis Kubiak lived on a farm about two miles south of the Pearson place.

In 1946, the Pearson place came up for sale, but John and Connie decided not to buy the place and moved to another rent house a short distance down the road near the Kie Storemski farm. During this time, Dan started school in Reagan and spent many a day riding to town with his dad. On rainy days, they often got stuck on the muddy road and Dan would come home covered with mud from head to toe!

In 1947, John finished building a new home in Reagan (with the help of Kie Storemski and Mike Snider) and the Kubiak family moved from the farm to town! The new homestead was just a few blocks from John's blacksmith shop and had two acres of land, enough to raise cows, hogs, chickens, ducks and geese and a sizable garden. The school and Methodist Church was directly across the road and three grocery stores were just blocks away. They even had an ice house! For the next eight years, John and Connie lived in Reagan where two more children were born (Richard and Shirley). These were the first of Connie's children to be born in a hospital.

In the early 50's, farming all but died out in the Reagan area and most stores in the little town went out of business. John decided to expand his business to include a beer joint to supplement his income. One of the colored men (Ben) in Reagan did his barbecuing and, for a while, business thrived. However, the blacksmith business continued to decline and, in 1951, John was forced to quit the blacksmith business and went to work for Fisher Plumbing Company in Marlin as a plumber.

In 1952, John was in a truck accident that left him with a crushed leg and in bed for a long period of time. The family pulled together for survival during this difficult time. Connie and the kids, Dan, Leonard and Jean, worked as hired hands for the nearby farmers hoeing cotton, picking cotton and any other jobs that came along (such as mowing lawns with a weed slinger and push lawn mower or hoeing weeds at the Reagan Cemetery). They worked the gardens, took care of the farm animals, milked two cows every morning and evening, and sold eggs to help ends meet.

After fully recovering from the truck accident, John went back to plumbing and worked part time at building up a herd of cattle. At this time, he rented a place just off the Kosse highway. In 1954, John got a big break. That was the year he was hired at the new Alcoa Aluminum plant in Rockdale. This gave him the cash he needed to buy land in Reagan and continue building up a herd of cattle. A year later, John bought a small house in Rockdale and moved the family. He continued to commute to Reagan to tend to his cattle on his days off.

In the early 60's, John sold his farm in Reagan and bought a large farm adjoining the Country Club in Rockdale. The kids and grandkids still talk of the activities associated with moving the herd to the new farm in Rockdale. The cows broke out shortly after arriving on the farm and dashed up the road to a peanut patch ready for harvest. Most of the day was spent in getting the cows rounded up and moving toward the farm only to see the cows race back to the woods like a pack of gazelles. Finally, the peanut patch was trampled into the dirt and all the kids were too exhausted to continue. “A nearby rancher with horse and cattle dogs offered to help but John didn’t want to spook the cows” recalled son-in-law, Newton Cundieff who was helping with the roundup.

The next day, Dad called Newton and smugly announced the cows had been moved to the farm with the aid of a bag of range cubes! In 1977, John retired from Alcoa Aluminum.

Over the years, most of John and Connie's kids attended college, got married and settled down in central Texas. Dan, Jean and Leonard graduated from the University of Texas, L.B. graduated from Texas A&M University and Richard graduated from Lamar University and The University of Texas Dental School at Houston. All total, the family includes two politicians, a veterinarian, a builder, a dentist, a computer engineer and two teachers.

John and Connie attend St. Joseph's Catholic Church and spend most major holidays hosting a visit from the kids and grandkids. The family is very close and gathers to celebrate most major holidays including Christmas Eve, Thanksgiving, Easter, and others. So far, they've never missed a Christmas Eve gathering to exchange Christmas gifts.

Christmas Eve of 1985 saw the handing of a "cat" to Dad and Richard by L.B. and Leonard on the very first game of dominos. Dan then called Newton in Wyoming, "Newton... I want you to talk to the proud owner of the first cat tonight!"

He handed the phone to Dad who was silent for a few seconds and then admitted, "Yep, we got 'em!"

Connie spend most of her time gardening and raising every type of tree and plant known to modern science. She had a "green thumb" and all the daughters-in-law come around for advice and plant cuttings. While she lived in the city of Rockdale, she continued to raise chickens for fresh eggs and always raised a big garden.

Just after celebrating their 50th (Golden) wedding anniversary in 1986, John and Connie moved to a restored farmhouse out on their farm. For about a year, John and Connie's sons pitched in and restored the old house to include modern carpeting, central heat and air, a three car garage, and a built-in green house.

The Mustard Cat of 96

On new Years Day in 1996, a famous “mustard Cat” came to visit at the Kubiak farm. Outside, a chilling Arctic cold front was cooling things down as the Kubiak, Stewart, and Cundieff families gathered for their annual New Year’s Day celebrations. Inside the warm spacious country home, the aroma of ham and black eye peas and Polish sausage drifted throughout and mingled with the sounds of laughter and new years wishes that could be heard in every room. Earlier in the day, Newton had cooked up a large skillet of Elgin sausage and mother had cooked a pot of blackeye peas and ham and placed a pan of sauerkraut to simmer on the stove. Rosemary brought in a big pan of blackeye peas and pork tamales and by now it was clear no one would go hungry this first day of 1996.

For the most part, the womenfolk were gathered in the den visiting with Busha who had earlier celebrated her 80th birthday on July 5 of 1995. Busha’s daughters, Jean Cundieff (who was visiting from Farson, Wyoming) and Shirley Stewart were there as was her daughters-in-law, Jenny and Rosemary and granddaughters, Lindsey and Kristi.

The men folk made a courtesy call on Busha while others gathered around Papa at the domino table in the kitchen. The excitement of giving one of the Kubiaks or their in-laws a skunk in the game of 42 could already be felt. Papa, who had celebrated his 81st birthday just before Christmas (December 20th) was in the kitchen with his sons, Dan and Leonard and son-in-law Newton plus grandsons Kody and John. Suddenly, the front door burst open and in walked son-in-law Ricky Stewart and grandson, Shawn. Ricky was carrying his famous “Ricky Stewart-Home of the Cats” dominoes, an earlier gift from Jean and Newton. Decked out in his red suspenders, Ricky walked straight to the table and dumped the dominoes out of the box.

“Sit down brothers-in-law....a cat is about to fall!”. The challenge had been officially extended!

Dan and Leonard accepted the challenge and squared off against Ricky and his son, Shawn. Two miniature ceramic skunks were strategically placed on the edge of the table as a reminder of the ever present opportunity for one of the domino teams to get a cat.

The bidding was fast and furious but the luck of the draw this particular moment in history favored the Kubiaks. Loosing back to back “3-mark” and “2- mark” bids and now another “2-mark” bid was on the table, the Stewart team suddenly found themselves on the short end of “cat point” But Ricky remained cool, “I’m not worried, we’ve come through worse times against better opponents before”.

“Ricky, I think it’s time for you and Shawn to go feed the cows!” said one of Ricky’s brother-in-laws (one of the cat-avoiding practices invented by Papa just as he was about to get a cat one Christmas weekend back in the 70’s!) Ricky and Shawn just grinned and kept playing. Moments later, it was obvious that the first cat of 96 would indeed fall! However the skunk was not going to the Kubiak brothers as forecasted but rather to the challengers, Ricky and Shawn Steward. As Leonard turned over his remaining Dominos, Dan noted, “The cat has fallen!” and he proceeded to draw a fine picture of a skunk on the scorepad.

And Newton was quick to point out, “This is the famous first cat of the year which carries far greater significance than any cat that might fall in the coming days and weeks”.

Shortly after the first skunk had officially arrived at the Kubiak farm and been duly drawn into the scorepad, Lindsey came through the front door and her dad, L.B was close behind.

“Let’s not say anything about the cat” said Leonard who was seated at the domino table with his son, John and another team of challengers, Newton and Dad. As L.B. approached the domino table, his eyes came to rest on the familiar drawing of a skunk on the scorepad. However, everyone was strangely silent about the cat pictured on the yellow sheet of paper laying on the table.

“Looks like a cat has already fallen” said L.B. as he walked over to the stove to prepare a sausage wraparound. At this time, Ricky Stewart was also standing right next to L.B. at the stove.

“Wonder who that cat belongs to ?” L.B. asked as he started on his sandwich. To his amazement, Ricky totally ignored the question of skunk ownership (like he hadn’t even heard the question but we all knew he did) and replied ”Boy, that’s some good mustard over there”.

“Mustard? I’m talking cat here!” replied L.B. still working on his sandwich. “Oh... I bet I know who got that cat” L.B. said with a grin as he cut his eyes back toward Ricky.

About this point, the players at the table picked up on the fact that L.B. had inquired about the cat but that Ricky had responded about the fine mustard over next to the stove. “Guess the cats out of the bag! piped up grandson John Kubiak with a big grin on his face. Laughter burst out and it was several minutes before you could hear yourself speak.

For the next couple of hours, poor Ricky was constantly reminded about the “Mustard Cat of 96”. In all fairness, Ricky said he didn’t hear L.B.s question about the cat owner but nevertheless, the Mustard Cat of 96 came to live near Papa’s farm on the first day of 1996.

Then several months later, Dan had a domino game going at the table in the kitchen when Ricky Stewart entered the home and noticed that Dan had a cat recorded on the scorepad. “What you gonna feed that cat?” Ricky inquired.

Without batting an eye, Dan replied, “Mustard!” Ricky was so dumbfonded that he turned around and walked away without saying another word. The famous mustard cat is still spoken of in domino circles around the Kubiak home to this very day.

John and Connie continued to work on the farm and raise a big garden. Jean and Newton would come down and spend the summers canning and processing peaches and corn for the freezer.

In May of 1996, Jean lost her bout with breast cancer and was burried in the IOOF Cemetery in Rockdale. In August of 1999, Dan died suddenly of a heart attack. Dan was burried in the state cemetery in Austin.

On January 26, 2000, Mother passed away and dad died on Good Friday, April 13, 2001. Both are buried beside Jean in the IOOF cemetery in Rockdale.

Eulogy: Connie (Snider) Kubiak (Written by Leonard and Kelly Kubiak; Eulogy delived at Mother’s funeral by Kelly Kubiak, January 29, 1999).

Connie (Snider) Kubiak was my Boosha…..my grandmother….and if you’ll bear with me for a few minutes, I’d like to share with you a little about the person we knew and loved.

Connie Magdelyn Snider was born on a farm in Robertson County near Bremond, Texas on July 5, 1915. The First World War had just broken out in Europe about this time…..it was a tough time for America….and for the Snider family.

Connie was one of 8 children born to Mike and Veronica (Grudziecki) Snider. Connie’s brothers and sisters included: John, Bruno, Bill, Louis, Lee, Willie, and Christine.

As a young girl, Connie plowed cotton fields alongside her older sister Willie and her dad and older brothers. At night, she helped her mother and sisters with the cooking and cleaning and taking care of the younger Snider children. She also helped pull corn and pick cotton. During the great depression days, everyone had to work hard just for the family’s survival.

Although they worked hard, they still found time for vacations. After the crops were laid by, they would pack their wagons, hitch up the mule teams and make the long trip to Rosebud to an Uncle’s farm. There they loaded up with watermelons and went on to the falls on the Brazos River for several days of swimming, fishing and relaxing.

In 1924, when Connie was still a young girl, she met a young boy named John Kubiak at an elementary school near Wooten Wells in Robertson County. Twelve years later, Connie married that same boy at the Catholic Church in Bremond on November 4, 1936. John and Connie have been married over 63 years and have known each other for over 75 years. The breadth of their marriage is a testament to their commitment and love to each other.

Up until the early 50’s in the rural areas of Texas and elsewhere, women had their babies at home without benefit of pain killing medications and hospitals . Often, instead of a doctor, a mid-wife helped deliver the baby. Connie’s first four children were born at home and delivered by a midwife, who happened to be Connie’s mother-in-law, Clara Kubiak. The first baby born in a hospital was Richard. This was a blessing, since Richard was a breach baby. My dad used to say that Richard was the one Kubiak boy that got all the hair…..because he was born a breach baby. To my dad, this was no coincidence!

After World War II ended, Connie and John moved to Reagan in Falls County where John went into business as a blacksmith and mechanic. On their 2-acre homestead, John and Connie, with the help of their children, raised most of their food. They planted and harvested a big garden, had a big fruit orchard, and raised cattle, poultry, and pigs. On one occasion, my father had raised several large pigs for the 4H. However, tragedy struck one day when the favorite pig was poisoned. The entire family was upset, but Boosha was particularly saddened by this loss. She would have a kind heart for animals her entire life.

Connie baked home made bread, butter from fresh milk, helped harvest and cook vegetables from the garden, washed clothes with a rub board and still managed to raise six children: Dan, Leonard, Jean, L.B., Richard, and Shirley Ann. She was a strict disciplinarian, although sometimes….mysteriously…..the belts and fly-swatters would disappear…..but there was always a peach tree limb nearby.

Connie ensured that her family received a strong Christian upbringing. Regardless of the weather or road conditions, Connie and John got their children to church every Sunday. Throughout her life, Connie remained strong in her faith.

In 1955, the family left Reagan and moved to Rockdale where John was employed at Alcoa. For a while, John and Connie lived in town at 439 West Belton where Connie took care of her children and worked in her vegetable and flower gardens and raised chickens for fresh eggs. She loved her chickens, but Leonard recalls one fiesty game rooster that kept spurring her legs when she would visit the coop. Boosha did love animals, but she had her limits. The next time, that rooster was soon greeted with the end of a firm broom handle.

In 1985, John and Connie moved back to a farm just south of Rockdale where Boosh lived until her death on January 26, 1999. At the farm, as throughout her whole life, Connie’s great joys in life were centered around home and family. Kids, grandkids and relatives frequently gathered at the Kubiak home for celebrations of all major holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries. Lot’s of good food, fun, laughter and of course...42 dominoes.

John and Connie had six children (Dan, Leonard, Jean, LB, Richard and Shirley) and 13 grandchildren including Randall, John, Kelly, Alyssa, Kody, Kristi, Shawn, Lindsay, Logan, LaNell, Keith, Laurie, and Michelle and two great grandchildren: Dakota and Randi Kubiak.

Connie was referred to as “Boosha” which is short for the Polish word for grandmother. She was affectionately called “Boosh” by the grandkids. Boosh had an especially soft spot in her heart for the little ones. Boosh’s love was patient and warm and non-pretentous. Boosh was always just Boosh and her love was cherished by all.

My cousin Shawn remembers going to Boosha’s every day for lunch. Her cooking was so good that you couldn’t stop after just one helping. Shawn loved these lunches with his Boosha, but his full belly made it difficult to stay awake in afternoon class. Personally, I can remember coming to Boosha’s house after Elementary school, which was just a 5 min walk away. She would always greet me with genuine smile and of course….some warm food on the stove. We would sit and talk until my Dad picked me up. I was always struck by her warm, friendly, motherly nature. You felt completely safe and peaceful around her.....she was a haven of unconditional love and understanding.

Boosh had a simple wisdom about her. She derived pleasure from the little things in life.....a trait that is all too rare in today’s day and age. She loved nature...seeing the colorful birds and flowers, watching a colorful sunrise or sunset, seeing little plants come up in the garden, seeing her pups (Shelia and Scooby) on the front porch, and listening to the rain falling. These kinds of things were far more important to Boosh than material wealth.

Boosh was a great cook and always had a pot of fresh black-eye peas or one of her other Polish dish specialties like homemade noodles, potato soup or pumpkin and dumplings simmering on the stove. Her dewberry pies were legendary around the Kubiak homestead. And if you found a watermelon in the fridge, you’d better hang on to it……you see watermelon was one of Boosha’s favorite foods!

Connie was blessed with a green thumb when it came to gardening. Her yard was always landscaped with a beautiful assortment of blooming flowers and shrubs which she so generously shared with her children and grandchildren, friends, relatives, and the church. It always amazed the kids and grandkids how Boosh knew all the names of all the flowers, shrubs and trees in her yard. At the farm, Boosh had a greenhouse which she kept full of plants and shrubs.

One of the great joys in Boosh’s life was the annual Snider Family Reunion that her son Dan and her niece, Elevelyn, helped organize in the early 80’s. Two of her brother’s, Louis and Lee played fiddles in the Polish Western band that became an integral part of the reunion. Music, laughter, good food and surrounded by family, Boosh spent some of her happiest times on earth here.

One of Boosha’s greatest and most memorable traits was her sense of humor. She could turn all frowns to smiles with her cute smile and a giggle. She loved to sit and laugh at George Jefferson, Mama Harper, and Papa’s “messin’ with those cows.” Boosha even found laughter in the most difficult of times. Shirley recalls a time when Boosha’s blood pressure was dangerously high (230/130). While the nurse was in a panic calling the Rockdale EMT’s, Boosha sat calmly at the table.....eating her orange....and of course, smiling that Boosha smile. And as the ambulance pulled away, Shirley could see her mom still smiling back and plainly waving goodbye.....almost as if she were going on a Sunday cruise.

Even during Boosha’s last few months on this earth, she found ways to bring smiles. She made light of the medical aids that here body had become dependent upon. Instead of being depressed about her condition, she would giggle at how she looked with an oxygen mask, and she affectionately named her walker Cheerio! When she was ready to go somewhere, she’d look around and say, “Let’s go Cheerio!”

In 1997 as Connie’s health began to fail and she needed a little more care, the kids and grandkids instituted a weekly Thursday get-together at Boosh and papa’s house. The kids took turns bringing food and a lively game of dominoes would always follow the fellowship supper. These gatherings gave everyone a chance to spend quality time with Boosh.

This is the essence of what Boosh was all about. She raised a large Christian family, taught us how to work, how to laugh, the value of good friends and family and how to take time out to smell the roses. This is Boosha’s legacy, and this is how we will remember her.



John W. Snider Family History
Willie (Snider)Storemski Family History
Connie (Snider) Kubiak Family History
William Marion (Bill) Snider Family History
Bruno Snider Family History
Christine (Snider)Knapik Family History
Louis Snider Family History
Lee Snider Family History

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Over time, I intend to include family history information for all families that tie back to Tom and Jacob Snider. Bear with me, this will take some time!

Leonard Kubiak

For questions or comments, send me an Email


Click Here to Return to the Snider Family Homepage










LEONARD KUBIAK's TEXAS HISTORY WEB PAGES

History of the area

| Prehistoric History of the Liberty Hill Region | Liberty Hill Settlement in the 1850's | History of the Liberty Hill Stage Coach Stop (1852) | Liberty Hill -Then and Now | The Founding of New Liberty Hill (1882) | | History of Reagan, Texas | History of Busksnort and Marlin, Texas | History of Reagan, Texas | Sam Houston-Early-day Texas History | Officers and Men of the Republic of Texas | General George Custer | Generals Robert E. Lee and U.S. Grant | Famous Sam Bass Outlaw Gang | Indian Treaty Signed With the Comanches, Kiowas, and Apaches in 1867| Governor John Conally, Another Tall Texan | Important Documents of Early-Day Texas | Battle of San Jacinto-Victory for the Republic of Texas Army | History of Rockdale, Milam County, Texas | Military Forts in Early Day Texas | History of Cedar Springs, Wilderville, and Rosebud, pioneer communities in Falls County, Texas | Blueridge Cemetery Roll, Falls County, Texas| History of Bremond and Wootan Wells, Robertson County, Texas | Waite (Reagan)Cemetery Listing | Blue Ridge (Reagan)Cemetery Listing|Hog Island (Reagan) Cemetery Listing|Johnson (Reagan)Cemetery Listing|Powers/McCaleb(Reagan)Cemetery Listing







FORT TUMBLEWEED LINKS



| Visit the StageCoach Shop Museum Store | Visit the OK Coral Old West Store | Our Christmas Store and More | Our Online Relics and Fossils catalog | Reserving the site for special occasions | Upcoming events at the Fort | Our favorite links | Liberty Hill-Gateway to the Texas Hill Country | History of the Fort Tumbleweed site | Dan Kubiak Memorial Page | Jean Kubiak Cundieff Memorial Page |

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Copyright © 1996-2013. All rights reserved by Leonard Kubiak. Fort Tumbleweed and forttumbleweed are trademarked by Leonard Kubiak. No Part of this Website nor any of it's contents may be reproduced in any manner without written permission of
lenkubiak.geo@yahoo.com



Web design by Len Kubiak lenkubiak.geo@yahoo.com Send me an email if you need help setting up a web page.




This RingSurf THE GHOST TOWN WEBRING Net Ring
owned by Fort Tumbleweed Old West Town.

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